Office Information

WVU Extension Service
Ohio County Office
51 Sixteenth Street—Room 301
Wheeling, WV 26003

Phone: 304-234-3673
Fax: 304-234-3828
Hours: Mon-Fri 8:00 to 4:30
Driving Directions

Ohio County Map

Ag Minute ExtensionServiceLogo2015

What's in it for me?

August 18, 2016

Ever wonder why you spend your time helping and volunteering? Ever wish meetings were shorter and more efficient? If you’ve ever had these thoughts run through your mind, then this event is for you!

What’s in it for me? Personal and professional growth through Volunteer Leadership

September 24th, 9-4pm

Restore enthusiasm and find confidence! Learn the tools and techniques for running efficient and effective meetings and bring vigor to your volunteers!

This program is designed not just for current leaders but for those who may consider a leadership role in the future or just want to ignite a spark in their group. Become the first group of volunteers to receive a certificate of Volunteer Leadership Engagement from the WVU Extension Service.

Light morning refreshments, a fun team building activity, lunch, and a Learn-by-Doing visioning and facilitation exercise, and great speakers!
Susan England Lord: The Magic of Volunteer Leadership
Norm Schwertfeger: Developing Engaged Non-Profit Boards
Kelly Nix: The Effective Meeting Facilitator: Maximizing Engagement Results

West Virginia Northern Community College’s B&O Building, 1704 Market St., Wheeling, WV

Registration is only $10 but space is limited s register soon! Contact the Ohio County Extension office to register or learn more 304-234-3673 or e-mail karen.cox@mail.wvu.edu

Flooding in the Garden

July 1, 2016

Following are flood recovery tips from the WVU Extension Service

Listen to: Flooded Vegetable Garden

If flood waters have covered your garden, consider the produce unsafe to eat for humans or animals. If flood waters have contacted the edible portion of a crop it is illegal to sell.
If touched by flood waters discard: leafy vegetables, fleshy fruits or vegetables (like tomatoes, berries, & summer squash), corn, grains, and even produce with a hard protective skin. Root crops that are ripe or near harvest should also be discarded. Record all losses.

If the edible portion develops after flood waters recede it should be safe to eat. Underground vegetables roughly four months from harvest should be safe at maturity. Discard greens, wash, and disinfect in a weak bleach solution. Then peel and cook thoroughly before eating.
Segregate non-flood affected crops and sanitize yourself and your equipment between fields to avoid cross contamination

When it comes to food safety: When in doubt, throw it out.

Your county Extension agent has more information.

http://ext.wvu.edu/disasters/flooding/can-i-eat-produce-from-my-garden-after-a-flood
http://www.uvm.edu/vtvegandberry/factsheets/Flooded_Produce_FAQ.pdf
http://ohioline.osu.edu/factsheet/anr-27
http://www.fda.gov/food/guidanceregulation/guidancedocumentsregulatoryinformation/ucm287808.htm


Ag Minute from the West Virginia University Extension Service offers researched-based tips and tricks for your farm, garden, or home.

Contact the WVU Extension Service Ohio County Office with your questions and comments!

Programs and activities offered by the West Virginia University Extension Service are available to all persons without regard to race, color, sex, disability, religion, age, veteran status, political beliefs, sexual orientation, national origin, and marital or family status.


The W.V.U. Extension Service sends these tips to help during flood recovery efforts.

Listen to: Flooding in the Pantry Sanitizing cans

Floodwaters can make foods unsafe. If you have a question about the safety of any food item, throw it out.

Undented cans of food without rust can be saved if they are washed and sanitized before opening.
To sanitize steel cans: Put on rubber gloves then remove paper labels and set aside. Wash cans in a strong detergent solution. Use a brush to remove any dirt. Rinse well.

Soak the clean, rinsed containers for 15 minutes in solution of 1 cup of chlorine bleach in 5 gallons of lukewarm water. Dump and make new solution whenever it starts to get cloudy.
Remove cans from the bleach solution and allow them to air dry completely. Relabel with permanent marker and include expiration date then discard label as it may hold toxins. Use disinfected cans as soon as possible because they may rust.

For added safety, boil food before eating.
Note: do not use your fireplace to cook until it has been inspected.

More information can be found on the CDC disaster webpage or your county health department.

https://www.cdc.gov/disasters/foodwater/

http://emergency.cdc.gov/disasters/hurricanes/pdf/flyer-keepfoodsafe.pdf

http://www.kchdwv.org/Home/Environmental/Flood.aspx

http://ext.wvu.edu/disasters/flooding/food-safety-after-a-flood


Ag Minute from the West Virginia University Extension Service offers researched-based tips and tricks for your farm, garden, or home.

Contact the WVU Extension Service Ohio County Office with your questions and comments!

Programs and activities offered by the West Virginia University Extension Service are available to all persons without regard to race, color, sex, disability, religion, age, veteran status, political beliefs, sexual orientation, national origin, and marital or family status.


Following are Flood Recovery tips from the W.V.U. Extension Service.

Listen to: Flooding in the Pantry

Food touched by floodwaters can make you very sick. Discard any and all food if it came in contact with flood water. The only exceptions are foods canned by a manufacturer.

Flooded foods you must discard include anything that was open, fresh produce, meat, and eggs. Throw out any food in boxes, plastic containers, and other packages, including glass jars, even if still sealed. You must discard home-canned foods if contacted by floodwaters.

Manufactured cans that are dented, leaking, bulging, or rusted; or cans that have been moved by waters and are far from their normal storage spot must also be discarded.

Finally throw out any and All foods that may have been contaminated with industrial waste water, including unopened cans.

When in doubt, throw food out! Be sure to record all food that was discarded due to the flood.

More information can be found on the CDC disaster webpage or by contacting your county health department.

https://www.cdc.gov/disasters/foodwater/
http://emergency.cdc.gov/disasters/hurricanes/pdf/flyer-keepfoodsafe.pdf
http://www.kchdwv.org/Home/Environmental/Flood.aspx
http://ext.wvu.edu/disasters/flooding/food-safety-after-a-flood


Ag Minute from the West Virginia University Extension Service offers researched-based tips and tricks for your farm, garden, or home.

Contact the WVU Extension Service Ohio County Office with your questions and comments!

Programs and activities offered by the West Virginia University Extension Service are available to all persons without regard to race, color, sex, disability, religion, age, veteran status, political beliefs, sexual orientation, national origin, and marital or family status.


Flood Recovery tips from W.V.U. Extension Service.

Listen to: Livestock Post Flooding Vaccines

Quickly remove all flood debris, including poisonous plants, from fields. Vaccinate all livestock, including horses, exposed to flooded areas during or immediately after the flood. Check with your veterinarian about which clostridial and tetanus vaccines to use for your animals and if you will need boosters. Closely inspect all livestock that were exposed to flooded areas for injuries. Open wounds need a tetanus antitoxin. Always follow label directions.

Learn more at your local extension office, or online at:

http://ext.wvu.edu/disasters/flooding/forage-and-livestock-management-post-flooding

http://ext.wvu.edu/disasters/flooding/maintaining-livestock-health-after-a-flood


Ag Minute from the West Virginia University Extension Service offers researched-based tips and tricks for your farm, garden, or home.

Contact the WVU Extension Service Ohio County Office with your questions and comments!

Programs and activities offered by the West Virginia University Extension Service are available to all persons without regard to race, color, sex, disability, religion, age, veteran status, political beliefs, sexual orientation, national origin, and marital or family status.


Flooded Hay

July 1, 2016

Flood Recovery tips from W.V.U. Extension Service.

Listen to: Flooded Hay

Unroll or spread Flood damaged hay to allow it to decompose more quickly and prevent fires. Place hay in areas which need erosion control or nutrients. Protect your lungs, wear a mask the entire time you work with flood damaged forages. Do not unroll hay in areas where livestock are currently or will be placed before the hay fully decomposes. Do not feed flood damaged hay.

For more information contact your local extension office or visit: http://ext.wvu.edu/disasters/flooding/forage-and-livestock-management-post-flooding


Ag Minute from the West Virginia University Extension Service offers researched-based tips and tricks for your farm, garden, or home.

Contact the WVU Extension Service Ohio County Office with your questions and comments!

Programs and activities offered by the West Virginia University Extension Service are available to all persons without regard to race, color, sex, disability, religion, age, veteran status, political beliefs, sexual orientation, national origin, and marital or family status.


Flooded Bales

July 1, 2016

Following are Flood Recovery tips from the W.V.U. Extension Service.

Listen to: Flooded Bales

Flooded hay and baleage can cause illness or death to livestock. Discard dry hay that has been soaked by flood water, do not use for feed. Inline wrapped baleage that was not fully sealed on both ends should not be fed to livestock. Individual baleage rolls wrapped in undamaged plastic may be useable if certain conditions are met. Contact your local extension agent for details.
If in doubt, don’t risk it, throw it out. Document all lost forage.

For more information contact your local extension office or visit: http://ext.wvu.edu/disasters/flooding/forage-and-livestock-management-post-flooding


Ag Minute from the West Virginia University Extension Service offers researched-based tips and tricks for your farm, garden, or home.

Contact the WVU Extension Service Ohio County Office with your questions and comments!

Programs and activities offered by the West Virginia University Extension Service are available to all persons without regard to race, color, sex, disability, religion, age, veteran status, political beliefs, sexual orientation, national origin, and marital or family status.


Following are some flood Recovery tips from the W.V.U. Extension Service.
Listen to: Flooded Forages are not safe

Remove livestock from flood damaged pastures. Provide clean water and clean forage. Flooded forages should not be fed. Cut flooded pasture and hay fields to a 2 to 4-inch stubble height. Don’t breathe silt dust, wear a mask. Document amount of lost forage.

Do not make hay from or graze flooded fields until grass has regrown to a height of 8-10 inches.

For more information contact your local extension office or visit: http://ext.wvu.edu/disasters/flooding/forage-and-livestock-management-post-flooding


Ag Minute from the West Virginia University Extension Service offers researched-based tips and tricks for your farm, garden, or home.

Contact the WVU Extension Service Ohio County Office with your questions and comments!

Programs and activities offered by the West Virginia University Extension Service are available to all persons without regard to race, color, sex, disability, religion, age, veteran status, political beliefs, sexual orientation, national origin, and marital or family status.


Flooded Feed and Grain

July 1, 2016

Following are Flood Recovery tips from the W.V.U. Extension Service.

Listen to: Flooded Feed and Grain

Until tested, flooded feeds should be considered harmful to animals. After a flood, wet feed and grain will begin to heat and mold very quickly, leading to spoilage, mycotoxins, and potential spontaneous combustion. Remove unaffected grain and bales immediately and store them separately; moisture will quickly spread.

Flooded seed grain, hay, and silage are likely a complete loss. When in doubt, don’t risk it, throw it out!

Learn more at your local extension office, or online at http://ext.wvu.edu/disasters/flooding/salvaging-wet-feed-and-grain


Ag Minute from the West Virginia University Extension Service offers researched-based tips and tricks for your farm, garden, or home.

Contact the WVU Extension Service Ohio County Office with your questions and comments!

Programs and activities offered by the West Virginia University Extension Service are available to all persons without regard to race, color, sex, disability, religion, age, veteran status, political beliefs, sexual orientation, national origin, and marital or family status.


The W.V.U. Extension Service sends these tips to help during flood recovery efforts.

Listen to: The first steps Home after a flood

As the flood waters recede and you are allowed back into your home or business to assess the damage make sure you take lots of pictures of the building and its contents to document damages for insurance claims.

Keep watch for electrical dangers and report downed power lines immediately. As you enter buildings look for loose plaster or drywall, and ceilings that could fall. Also watch the floors for loose nails and boards.

If you have a septic tank, cesspool, pit, or leaching system record damages to those as well. Damaged sewage systems are health hazards and need to be serviced as soon as possible.
It is recommended to have an up to date tetanus vaccination, meaning within the last 10 years, before working in a flooded area.

Now more than ever it is important to wash your hands with clean or disinfected water and soap before eating, smoking, or touching your face.

Learn more at your local extension office, or online at http://ext.wvu.edu/disasters/flooding


Ag Minute from the West Virginia University Extension Service offers researched-based tips and tricks for your farm, garden, or home.

Contact the WVU Extension Service Ohio County Office with your questions and comments!

Programs and activities offered by the West Virginia University Extension Service are available to all persons without regard to race, color, sex, disability, religion, age, veteran status, political beliefs, sexual orientation, national origin, and marital or family status.